Friday, March 4, 2011

Weekend in Puebla and Atlixco

Way back in the beginning of February I spent the long weekend in Puebla with friends.

Saturday we went to Puebla -- the capital of the state (to see post from my visit with my parents to Puebla click here). Our "tour guide" for the weekend (Chang, a new friend who is from Puebla and was kind enough to invite us to stay with his family) introduced us to cemitas -- a Puebla standard. It's a (huge) sandwich differentiated mostly for the type of bread (sesame seeded egg roll according to wikipedia?).


enjoying the (huge!) cemita




















From there we spent some time in the artisans market and then wandered around downtown Puebla.


Puebla was originally called Puebla de los Angeles
and is sometimes referred to as Angelópolis




So. Many. Balloons.
(Zócalo, Cathedral in the background)


Municipal Palace


church

church


That evening we headed to Atlixco, which is the third-largest community in Puebla. We met Chang's family and enjoyed a delicious meal, including home-made mole! Puebla is known for it's food, but his mom's cooking was definitely the best I've had of the various Puebla staples. Case in point: From my previous experiences I would probably describe mole as interesting, but his mom's mole was delicious! 

Sunday morning we had tamales and atole and/or coffee for breakfast with his family. I had a sweet tamal, but there were also tamales with rajas or mole. Once again, the atole his mom made was the best I've tasted so far. 

From there, we set out to explore Atlixco. On our way into town we saw: 

A cat with clothes....

Cutting flowers, with the Popocatepetl volcano in the background.
Atlixco (and Puebla in general?) produces a lot of flowers












































Chang's mom bought Tati and I ceramic pots to cook with, similar to the type she uses. We climbed up to Capilla de San Miguel, a chapel on top of a large hill (small mountain?) to get a view of Atlixco and surrounding areas.

view of Atlixco. Climbing up to the Capilla de San Miguel
(with the pots his mom bought us)


view of Popocatepetl in the background

view of Popocatepetl

Plaza of the Dance of the Huey Atlixcayotl
(like the Voladores de Papántla). Since it's high up on the hill,
"flyers" can be seen from all around down below


flowers on a cactus 




view of Atlixco

Capilla de San Miguel


Atlixco

Atlixco

Coming down from the hill/mountain, we continued our tour of Atlixco.

Franciscan Convent, built around 1550

Franciscan Convent, built around 1550

Franciscan Convent, built around 1550

Temple of the Third Order

selling flowers in the Zócalo







mural of the history of Atlixco





mural of the history of Atlixco (ceiling)

mural of the history of Atlixco


mural of the history of Atlixco
The tree where the eagle landed, 

which was the sign to build the city there.
We saw the actual tree earlier in the day 

(the spring has dried up)
 but I didn't get a photo. 

mural of the history of Atlixco


mural of the history of Atlixco
Day of the Dead and Independence Day 

mural of the history of Atlixco

talavera 

mural of the history of Atlixco

Mural of Liberation from the Oppression Porfirio Diaz's Regime

Mural of Liberation from the Oppression Porfirio Diaz's Regime

church

Zócalo

Zócalo

lime nieve with red wine 

enjoying our nieve and sorbet and
(don't remember what its called, but its sweet 

and made out of seeds) out of our pots

view of Popocatepetl + the Franciscan Convenet + the Capilla de San Miguel

church

We went back to Chang's house and enjoyed some more delicious food and a great view of Popocateptl at sunset.
view of Popocateptl from a friend's house


view of Popocateptl from a friend's house




































We watched the Superbowl -- it wasn't the same without the commercials! I also realized my vocabulary to talk about American Football is rather limited. We left during the 3rd quarter to go to the bus station, but were able to watch more at the terminal and got the final score on the bus.

watching the Superbowl at the
bus terminal


For me, one of my favorite aspects of the weekend (besides exploring Atlixco of course) was spending time with the family -- Chang's mom and niece and nephew. They were so sweet, welcoming, generous -- all the best of the Mexican stereotype. It was interesting to see and hear about the migration experience from those that stay behind. I have worked with migrants in the US and studied migration, but hadn't really seen it "up close" on this side of the border. Chang's niece and nephew live with their grandmother because their mom lives and works in the US. They've grown up with their grandmother and know her better than their biological mother. They even call her mom. Along with other stories, it was an interesting first-hand view of how migration affects families. 

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